3 life advice about volunteering you need to hear from a hiker’s journey

Today’s Everyday Heroes series features a story of a hiker’s journey in his volunteering experience with Trybe. Takeda, an avid hiker, a full-time administrative officer at a government agency, a part-time student pursuing his Bachelor’s degree in psychology and a volunteer at Trybe speaks to us about his volunteering experience through a hiker’s perspective.

 
 

(Picture provided by Takeda)

Being a student in Singapore is by no means an easy feat. With a packed schedule, it is difficult to lead an unhurried life. Despite his busy schedule, Takeda would usually take a hike on Saturdays, spending the rest of his time studying or resting at home till the weekends are over.

In our conversation with Takeda, we concluded three important lessons from all that he had learnt from volunteering with youths.

1. Never lose your sense of wonder

Takeda shared that “as we grow older, progress in our careers and other commitments takes priority and we tend to forget the fun things we enjoyed in our youth.” As a hiker, there are times where there is too much focus on the over-glorified and breath-exclaiming destination that we forget that the journey is just as important. Enjoy the moment by taking time to enjoy the little things around us and the activities that we enjoyed in our youth. Enjoy the process!

(Picture provided by Takeda)

2. Things do go in a full circle

People have said that if you are lost, take 4 left turns (this does not work, by the way) but things come in a full circle. Takeda related to us his volunteering experience as “gratifying to see the participants grow into young adults capable of compassion and empowering others”. While taking 4 left turns might not be the best advice, but the journey of investing in someone else’s life is most rewarding when you see the youth you serve starting to serve someone else. To see that change empowers him to volunteer over and over again no matter how tired he is. All he knows is that he had a great experience and so did the youths. Things do go in a full circle.

“The journey of investing in someone else’s life is most rewarding when you see the youth you serve starting to serve someone else.”

3. See the good in others… and yourself

Have you ever travelled with your friends or a partner? It does bring out the uglier side of things, huh? There will be disputes over directions, petty quarrels over who ate the last Mars Bars but what would make the journey bearable is if we all choose to see the good in others and even yourself. The ability to see the good in others needs to start with seeing the good in yourself. Remember to not be too hard on yourself, when you can love yourself, then will you start to understand your weaknesses and strengths. By volunteering, Takeda says that it helps the youths to see the good in themselves and even empowering them to see the good in others. The ability to see good in others needs to first start with you. The world would be a happier place if we all choose to do this.

(photo by http://inspiration.susangilbert.com/post/109516090507/we-must-take-adventures-in-order-to-know-where-we )

To our everyday hero, Takeda, we are deeply appreciative of all you have done for us and the youths that you have helped to uncover the good in them. “We must take adventures to know where we truly belong”.

Take action today by volunteering or giving a small gift to help us nurture our youths.

Share this Post

3 life advice about volunteering you need to hear from a hiker’s journey

Today’s Everyday Heroes series features a story of a hiker’s journey in his volunteering experience with Trybe. Takeda, an avid hiker, a full-time administrative officer at a government agency, a part-time student pursuing his Bachelor’s degree in psychology and a volunteer at Trybe speaks to us about his volunteering experience through a hiker’s perspective.

(Picture provided by Takeda)

Being a student in Singapore is by no means an easy feat. With a packed schedule, it is difficult to lead an unhurried life. Despite his busy schedule, Takeda would usually take a hike on Saturdays, spending the rest of his time studying or resting at home till the weekends are over.

In our conversation with Takeda, we concluded three important lessons from all that he had learnt from volunteering with youths.

1. Never lose your sense of wonder

“As we grow older, progress in our careers and other commitments takes priority and we tend to forget the fun things we enjoyed in our youth.” As a hiker, there are times where there is too much focus on the over-glorified and breath-exclaiming destination that we forget that the journey is just as important. Take delight in the moment by taking time to enjoy the little things around us and the activities that we relished in our youth. Enjoy the process!

(Picture provided by Takeda)

2. Things do go in a full circle

People have said that if you are lost, take 4 left turns (this does not work, by the way) but things come in a full circle. Takeda related to us his volunteering experience as “gratifying to see the participants grow into young adults capable of compassion and empowering others”. While taking 4 left turns might not be the best advice, but the journey of investing in someone else’s life is most rewarding when you see the youth you serve starting to serve someone else. To see that change empowers him to volunteer over and over again no matter how tired he is. All he knows is that he had a great experience and so did the youths. Things do go in a full circle.

“The journey of investing in someone else’s life is most rewarding when you see the youth you serve starting to serve someone else.”

3. See the good in others… and yourself

Have you ever travelled with your friends or a partner? It does bring out the uglier side of things, huh? There will be disputes over directions, petty quarrels over who ate the last Mars Bars but what would make the journey bearable is if we all choose to see the good in others and even yourself. The ability to see the good in others needs to start with seeing the good in yourself. Remember to not be too hard on yourself, when you can love yourself, then will you start to understand your weaknesses and strengths. By volunteering, Takeda says that it helps the youths to see the good in themselves and even empowering them to see the good in others. The ability to see good in others needs to first start with you. The world would be a happier place if we all choose to do this.

(photo by http://inspiration.susangilbert.com/post/109516090507/we-must-take-adventures-in-order-to-know-where-we )

To our everyday hero, Takeda, we are deeply appreciative of all you have done for us and the youths that you have helped to uncover the good in them. “We must take adventures to know where we truly belong”.

Take action today by volunteering or giving a small gift to help us nurture our youths.

Share this Post

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